Crispy Scrapple with Sage

An economical but hearty dish, scrapple is satisfyingly crunchy on the outside and tender on the inside, very much like the texture of a hash brown, if hash browns were made with meat.

Crispy Dirty Fried Rice with Shrimp, Two Ways

This crispy dirty fried rice is an irresistible fusion of spicy Cajun and umami rich, salty Asian flavors. In one version, the liver is the star, while the shrimp add some extra textural interest, while in the second version the shrimp take center stage while the liver blends with the other ingredients for subtle richness.

Crispy Fried Pig’s Ears with Arugula and Capers

These deep-fried pig’s ears are salty, tender yet crispy, and super indulgent; the lemon vinaigrette arugula salad brings a fresh and acid element to the dish that balances the decadence of the pig’s ears.

Sichuan Twice-Cooked Pork (or Tripe)

While this recipe is amazing with pork belly—spicy, nuanced, with tender meat and vegetables—and my new favorite way to eat it is with tripe. Regardless of the protein you choose, this makes for a fabulous and authentic taste of Sichuan.

Menudo

Menudo is a comforting Mexican soup with melt-in-your-mouth tripe and hominy in a lightly spicy broth. Even if you’re not a devoted tripe-lover, this dish will make a convert of you.

Gras Double (Tripe Lyonnaise)

Gras double, or tripe lyonnaise, is a staple in the bouchons of Lyon, France. The name gras double describes the method of cooking it in two helpings of fat, which not only makes the tripe tender while still slightly chewy (about the same texture as really good calamari) but also gives it a subtle richness.

Forgotten Feast II: Offal Rising

Offal’s descent into ignominy is a mainly Western, modern phenomenon that is tightly bound up with issues of class. But there are pockets of our food culture that have either never stopped eating the “humble” parts or who have returned to it, finding something wholesome, exotic, or even erotic about it.

Forgotten Feast I: The Descent of Offal

Offal occupies a central place in my kitchen–but many Americans would never even try it, let alone attempt to cook with it themselves. In this article, I explore how offal used to be an integral part of the Western diet, and why it has suffered a fall from grace in modern times.